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How To Get An Investor Residence Permit

In order to lawfully take up residence in Zimbabwe, foreign investors are required to obtain an Investor Residence Permit from the Department of Immigration.

Application requirements:

a) Two certified passport size photographs of the applicant;

b) A certified copy of the investment certificate from the Zimbabwe Investment Authority;

c) The individual’s brief biography, clearly stating the applicant’s background in education, employment, investment in the country of origin and other pertinent issues;

d) The applicant’s recent banking history in the form of bank statements from the country of origin;

e) Proof of ready and sufficient funds available for transfer in furtherance of the venture;

f) Proof and value of any equipment to be transferred for use by the joint venture company in its operations;

g) Two fully completed Residence Permit application forms which must be attested by a commissioner of oaths or a notary public;

h) The Certificate of Registration/Incorporation of the joint venture company;

i) A copy of the project proposal;

j) A copy of the applicant’s birth certificate;

k) The applicant’s recent chest X-ray certificate;

l) Proof of residential status of the indigenous partner in the mining venture;

m) The applicant’s recent police clearance from the country of origin;

n) A letter addressed to the Principal Director of Immigration requesting the issuance of the Investor Residence Permit;

o) An indigenisation clearance letter from the Ministry of Youth Development, Indigenisation and Economic Empowerment;

p) A statutory fee of US$500.00.

Where all documentation is in order, the turnaround time for the processing of the Investor Residence Permit takes up to six weeks. In instances where the investor is to bring in foreign labour for the joint venture, the particular expatriate will be required to first obtain a temporary employment permit from the Department of Immigration before he may commence working for the joint venture company in Zimbabwe.

This article has been written for informational purposes only and is not legal advice. For professional advice, contact us.